Kathirvel K

Archive for October 2009

30 Free Vector Icons Like iPhone Set from dezinerfolio is presenting a fresh icons set, the icons are all in one .PSD file, well-layered, ready to modify & improve. These icons can also be used as iPhone menu bar icons.

Download : http://www.dezinerfolio.com/system/files/30_vector_icons_df.zip

Read More:http://www.cocut.cn/graphics/3626-free-iphone-icons-vector.html

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Test the ColdFusion server
To test the ColdFusion server:
Make sure the ColdFusion server is started.
Depending on your decision during the installation, ColdFusion may start automatically when you start your computer or you may have to start it manually.
To start ColdFusion manually in Windows, select Start > Control Panel > Administrative Tools, then double-click Services. Right-click ColdFusion 8 Application Server and select Start. Right-click and start ColdFusion 8 ODBC Server and ColdFusion 8 ODBC Agent.
To start ColdFusion manually on a Macintosh, open Finder, go to Applications/ColdFusion8, and double-click ColdFusionLauncher. In the ColdFusionLauncher dialog box, click Start ColdFusion 8.
In Dreamweaver, or any text editor, create a plain-text file, and call it timetest.cfm.
In the file, enter the following code:
<p>This page was created at <b>
<cfoutput>#TimeFormat(Now(), “HH:mm:ss”)#</cfoutput>
</b> on the computer running ColdFusion.</p>
This code displays the time when the page was processed on the server.
Copy the file to the web root folder of the computer running ColdFusion.
If ColdFusion is running on your local computer, copy the file to the following folder:
Windows: C:\ColdFusion8\wwwroot\
Macintosh: Applications/ColdFusion8/wwwroot/
In your web browser, enter the URL of your test page, and then press Enter.
If ColdFusion is running on your local computer, enter the following URL:
By default, the ColdFusion server uses port 8500.
If the test page opens and displays the current time, the application server is running normally. The specified time is known as dynamic content because it changes every time you request the page. Click your browser’s Refresh button to generate a new page with a different time.
Note: Looking at the source code (View > Source In Internet Explorer) will confirm that the page does not use any client-side JavaScript to achieve this effect.

Make sure the ColdFusion server is started.

Depending on your decision during the installation, ColdFusion may start automatically when you start your computer or you may have to start it manually.

To start ColdFusion manually in Windows, select Start > Control Panel > Administrative Tools, then double-click Services. Right-click ColdFusion 8 Application Server and select Start. Right-click and start ColdFusion 8 ODBC Server and ColdFusion 8 ODBC Agent.

To start ColdFusion manually on a Macintosh, open Finder, go to Applications/ColdFusion8, and double-click ColdFusionLauncher. In the ColdFusionLauncher dialog box, click Start ColdFusion 8.

In Dreamweaver, or any text editor, create a plain-text file, and call it timetest.cfm.

In the file, enter the following code:

<p>This page was created at <b>

<cfoutput>#TimeFormat(Now(), “HH:mm:ss”)#</cfoutput>

</b> on the computer running ColdFusion.</p>

This code displays the time when the page was processed on the server.

Copy the file to the web root folder of the computer running ColdFusion.

If ColdFusion is running on your local computer, copy the file to the following folder:

Windows: C:\ColdFusion8\wwwroot\

Macintosh: Applications/ColdFusion8/wwwroot/

In your web browser, enter the URL of your test page, and then press Enter.

If ColdFusion is running on your local computer, enter the following URL:

http://localhost:8500/timetest.cfm

By default, the ColdFusion server uses port 8500.

If the test page opens and displays the current time, the application server is running normally. The specified time is known as dynamic content because it changes every time you request the page. Click your browser’s Refresh button to generate a new page with a different time.

Note: Looking at the source code (View > Source In Internet Explorer) will confirm that the page does not use any client-side JavaScript to achieve this effect.

Source:http://www.adobe.com/devnet/dreamweaver/articles/setup_coldfusion_02.html

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A UI component common in many applications (and starting to become common on the web as well) is the accordion menu. A number of javascript libraries provide nice and simple accordion menus, but today we are going to take a look at how to build our own – because, well, that is what we do here at Switch On The Code!

Below, you can see the example that we are going to build today. It is a pretty simple animated accordion, where each menu is collapsible/expandable. You can have them all collapsed, or a single menu open. It should be pretty self-explanatory, so play around!

http://www.switchonthecode.com/tutorials/javascript-and-css-tutorial-accordion-menus

What is Web 3.0? What is the difference between Web 2.0 and Web 3.0, or the Semantic Web? This article will examine the confusion surrounding Web 3.0.

The war of words between technology evangelists about Web 3.0 continues and, in particular, a series of blog posts were exchanged between Tim O’Reilly and Nova Spivack about the merits of “Web 3.0.”

What Is the Difference Between Web 3.0 and Web 2.0?

While O’Reilly believes that Web 3.0 is an extension of Web 2.0, Spivak – regarded as a champion of the term Web 3.0 – believes it will be a third generation web approximately between 2010 and 2020. In order to understand Web 3.0, we must balance it against the existing Web 2.0. In the Web 2.0 universe, searching Google for “Gary Price” will yield a plethora of unrelated hits. Web 3.0 solves this problem by providing context to searching for online information.

Intelligent Web

Web 2.0 is about social networking and mass collaboration with the blurring of lines between content creator and user whereas Web 3.0 is based on “intelligent” web applications using:

  • Natural language processing
  • Machine-based learning and reasoning
  • Intelligent applications

The goal is to tailor online searching and requests specifically to users’ preferences and needs. Although the intelligent web sounds similar to artificial intelligence, it’s not quite the same.

Openness

Web 3.0 is about openness. By “opening” application programming interfaces (APIs), protocols, data formats, open-source software platforms and open data, you open up possibilities for creating new tools. Although Unlike openness can result in identity theft, Web 3.0 attempts to remedy this through:

  • Open identity
  • OpenID
  • Open reputation
  • The ability for roaming portable identity and personal data.

  • Read more: http://internet.suite101.com/article.cfm/what_is_web_30#ixzz0SrjkXPRh

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    “Web 2.0” is commonly associated with web development and web design that facilitates interactive information sharing, interoperability, user-centered design and collaboration on the World Wide Web. Examples of Web 2.0 include web-based communities, hosted services, web applications, social-networking sites, video-sharing sites, wikis, blogs, mashups and folksonomies. A Web 2.0 site allows its users to interact with other users or to change website content, in contrast to non-interactive websites where users are limited to the passive viewing of information that is provided to them.

    Technology overview

    Web 2.0 draws together the capabilities of client– and server-side software, content syndication and the use of network protocols. Standards-oriented web browsers may use plugins and software extensions to handle the content and the user interactions. Web 2.0 sites provide users with information storage, creation, and dissemination capabilities that were not possible in the environment now known as “Web 1.0”.

    Web 2.0 websites typically include some of the following features and techniques. Andrew McAfee used the acronym SLATES to refer to them:

    Search

    Finding information through keyword search.
    Links
    Guides to other related information.
    Authoring
    The ability to create and update content leads to the collaborative work of many rather than just a few web authors. In wikis, users may extend, undo and redo each other’s work. In blogs, posts and the comments of individuals build up over time.
    Tags
    Categorization of content by users adding one-word descriptions to facilitate searching, without dependence on pre-made categories.
    Extensions
    Software that makes the Web an application platform as well as a document server.
    Signals
    The use of syndication technology such as RSS to notify users of content changes.
    Tags:
    1. Invest time in getting organized.
    2. Clean up your desk.

      Getting rid of the visual clutter around you will establish an environment where creativity can flourish.

    3. Estimate your capabilities and capacities.
      always ensure that you have enough time and resources to do the job justice, otherwise you’ll end up cutting corners, pushing back deadlines, and deliver a sub standard experience to the client and the user base.
    4. Be updated about current trends.
      React to, don’t blindly follow, trends. Ask yourself, “will those new practices look as perfect tomorrow?”
    5. Get to know your clients.
      Ask questions. A lot. Don’t be afraid of sounding stupid, or being a pain in the butt. It’s better you get a complete grasp of a project before embarking on it.
    6. Communicate and listen to your clients.
      Immerse yourself in who the client is and who the visitors are. Get to know the client as well as humanly possible, understand their motivation, their goals and really listen to their responses. Ensure you incorporate what they have to say into your thinking rather than deciding everything in advance.
    7. Make sure client’s needs are defined.
      Get to know what the projects is all about and what the client needs. Not what they want, what they need.
    8. Make sure the scope is defined.
      Dive deep into any data you can find to help frame your project. That includes existing product metrics, customer feedback, market landscape, and more. Saturate yourself with context. Find out exactly what’s involved and work out (in your head, at least) how you’re going to go about delivering.
    9. Make sure the goal is defined.

      Talk with the client. Understand their goals. Once you know this, your solutions can target those goals. Without it, it’s hard to defend a design. With it, you can explain how and why your design solves those problems.

    10. Make sure you have a good plan.
      Planning on paper helps you stay focused and ensures you won’t forget any of your ideas as you dive into the work. You don’t have to come up with a rigid schedule, but identifying key milestones, and what steps you need to do to complete them BEFORE you start will help keep you on track.
    11. Affirm the vision for the project.
      Often objectives summaries and punch lists aren’t enough, even a seminal vision should be reviewed in a casual brainstorming session to be sure that the initial steps taken are going to be productive and adversity averted.
    12. Observe the competition.
      You want to learn from the mistakes of your competition, even if you’re not out to make a buck on whatever it is you’re creating. Find out what they did right, what they did wrong, and what they didn’t do at all.
    13. Get money up front.
      Did I say get money up front? No matter how small you are, the client should respect you enough to pay you to get started.
    14. Clear your mind.
      If feasible, finish up previous projects or at least major milestones before starting a new project. This will help take any pressure off and clear your mind.
    15. Brainstorm, sketch!
      Write down as many random ideas and sketches as you can on pieces of paper. Nothing has to make sense or have any real value — but just get the ideas out on paper.
    16. Discuss your decisions.
      Bounce off your ideas with someone who has a keen critical sense. Research till you drop. Get as much collateral information about the market, similar projects. Clarify the brief till there are NO gray zone, because this will become your twilight zone.

    Source: http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2007/09/07/170-expert-ideas-from-worlds-leading-developers/